Rozšiřující studium AJ pro SŠ

The Literature, culture and history programme consists of the following courses:

  • New Literatures 1
  • New Literatures 2

The courses focus on the post-millennial period (after 2000) in Britain, the USA and former colonial regions, debating the recent political and cultural events and studying some of the literature produced in the last two decades. The programme aims to develop personal and professional competences of the teacher via critical reading and thinking and through practical demonstrations of working with a text.

As part of the programme, the students are asked to select and read the minimum of 5 books, see below.

Final exam

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

The Literature exam is partly integrated with Didactics and is based on the student reading experience informed by theories, approaches and strategies discussed, demonstrated and exercised in class, and on its application in teaching practice.

Prior to the exam, the student will submit their reading list, featuring a minimum of 5 books of quality fiction published in English-speaking countries after the year of 2000. The student will also present a lesson plan featuring the use of a text selected from contemporary literature, which the student-designed independently and subsequently piloted. The lesson plan must also be handed in prior to the exam.

The deadline for submissions is the minimum of 10 working days before the exam. The reading list and lesson plan must be submitted in a clearly signed file to the secretary. Please make sure you have your copies for the exam so that both you and the examiners have access to the relevant materials.

At the exam, the student will be asked to debate an item or items from the reading list and then discuss their lesson plan.

MORE INFORMATION

Some exceptions may apply to the reading list, such as a collection of poetry or stories replacing a novel, two plays replacing one novel, a theoretical book replacing one novel, or three young adult novels replacing one novel. However, we highly recommend any non-standard choices be always consulted with the relevant instructors.

If the student is unable to pilot the lesson plan, they will conduct a research on related to contemporary British/American literature and culture or literacy issues. The research must follow the basic principles of pedagogical research.

For more information, please refer to the instructors teaching the courses.

Methodology Courses

Below you can see an overview of what students of the Rozšiřující studium AJ pro SŠ programme can expect from each semester of Methodology and their Teaching Practice at our department.

You can find all necessary documents for your teaching practice at the Teaching Practice page.

Semester Methodology Course School Experience Course
1. AJ3DC_DIDA (colloquy)Basic principles of teaching teenage and young

adult learners, current issues in ELT

Literature:

Journal articles and online materials

Colloquy: classroom research presentations

2. AJ2MK_TEHO (credit)Testing and assessment in ELT

Literature:

HUGHES, Arthur. Testing for language teachers. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003

Year Tutors

The English department offers the system of year tutors to facilitate the communication between the students and the department. The role of the year tutors is to guide students through the sophisticated system of study rules and help them deal with challenges they may face.

Please feel free to contact your year tutor if you have questions. You can find out who your year tutor is by using the table below.

Year 1 Radek Vogel

Final Exams
See more information at the page on Final Exams – Rozšiřující studium AJ pro SŠ.

Final Work

When choosing a topic for the final work, students should choose a topic covered by one of the classes offered in this study programme. Students should then look at the topics suggested by members of our department in IS (under Packages of Topics, under Student) and select a supervisor to contact and work out the details of their cooperation with.
 
When choosing a topic for the final work, students should choose a topic covered by one of the classes offered in this study programme. Students should then look at the topics suggested by members of our department in IS (under Packages of Topics, under Student) and select a supervisor to contact and work out the details of their cooperation with.
No matter what the topic, the theses must be written in English.
 
No matter what the topic, the theses must be written in English.
The final version of the work needs to have minimum 54,000 characters, which translates to approximately 30 (not including figures and appendices). The deadline for submission (uploading the thesis into the archive in IS) is four weeks before the final exam. Two printed copies must follow soon after.
 
The final version of the work needs to have minimum 54,000 characters, which translates to approximately 30 pages (not including figures and appendices). The deadline for submission (uploading the thesis into the archive in IS) is four weeks before the final exam. Two printed copies must follow soon after.

Evaluation of the thesis will be given based upon a rubric for evaluation. Students should refer to the General Guidelines for Writing Theses, as well as the Sectional Instructions for Theses for those writing on topics in each section.